Galway In Days Gone By

Members of the Caherlistrane Hurling Club Committee at the Club's annual social in the Sacre Coeur Hotel, Salthill, in January 1970 (standing, from left): P Madden, T Craddock, C O 'Brien, J Flanagan, T O 'Brien, P Mulroe, P Mahon, P Gorman. Seated: P O'Neill (Treasurer) P Lee (Chairman), P Craddock, (Secretary), and Bro K McHugh.
Members of the Caherlistrane Hurling Club Committee at the Club's annual social in the Sacre Coeur Hotel, Salthill, in January 1970 (standing, from left): P Madden, T Craddock, C O 'Brien, J Flanagan, T O 'Brien, P Mulroe, P Mahon, P Gorman. Seated: P O'Neill (Treasurer) P Lee (Chairman), P Craddock, (Secretary), and Bro K McHugh.

1917

Archbishop’s illness

We regret to announce that His Grace the Archbishop, whose illness has caused universal regret, has recently grown worse, and on Friday last the announcement that his condition was serious was officially made through the Press.

On Tuesday, His Grace was reported to be in an unconscious state. The sorrow of the Catholic Church at the distinguished patient’s ill-health is expressed in the following message received at the Archiepiscopal Palace, Tuam, on Friday last: “The Pope expresses concern and sympathy, and sends Archbishop Apostolic Blessing.” There was no change in the condition of His Grace on Thursday morning.

Shell factory

The machinery for the Galway shell factory arrived via Limerick during the week, and it is expected that within a month, the factory will be turning out the expected 1,000 “18 pounder” shells a week.

The factory will afford a considerable amount of employment, and it is stated that between £300 and £400 will be expended each week in wages.

Watered milk

At Galway Petty Sessions, Wm. Crowe, Bohermore, was charged by Sergt. Dewey with delivering milk to the County Hospital containing 6.25 per cent of added water.

The Sergeant said that on several occasions he took samples of milk from the defendant, and this was the first occasion he found anything wrong.

Mr. Blake, solicitor, said his client regretted the offence. He had at times to buy milk in, in order to obtain the quantity required for his contract, and on this occasion, he had to buy the milk. If all the other contractors in Galway were as good as Mr. Crowe, there would not be any complaint. The defendant was fined 1s. and costs.

1942

The latest “Letter to the Editor” which has found its way to the waste paper basket – correspondents continue to air their views as lavishly as if there were no paper shortage – is from a gentleman who complains bitterly that we have not been publishing leading articles on the war!

We were under the impression that the war had persisted in creeping into almost every leading article during the past year – the establishment of Parish Councils to deal with the war-time conditions; the campaign for more tillage to cope with war-time shortage of food; the drive to augment the defence forces, the L.S.F., the Red Cross and other war-time organisations – all had to be referred to again and again editorially.

Presumably, however, our correspondent who is now reposing peacefully at the bottom of the W.P.B. wanted us to give him a sort of bird’s eye view at frequent intervals of the world conflict as we envisaged it. Apart from the fact that our country’s neutrality would have imposed considerable restrictions on editorial comment, we have never been sufficiently impressed by the “military critics” who abound in the newspapers and outside their columns to desire to emulate them.

As for the war news, plain and coloured, the country is flooded with it. The daily newspapers, both native and imported, seem to publish very little else. The radio babbles so much war news from every station that one has to go back to the gramophone for peaceful entertainment. The Man in the Street and in the Fields has forsaken the weather to sapiently discuss the march of armies. You cannot get away from the war in everyday life.

In the circumstances, it might be considered that the newspaper which spared its readers as much as possible of the ghastly chronicle of blood and agony was performing a public service and deserved a vote of thanks rather than a petulant letter. So far as we have been able to ascertain, our policy has been whole-heartedly endorsed by the overwhelming majority of our readers.

What happens on their own doorsteps is of more immediate interest to them than the clash of embattled forces at the other ends of the earth – and every inch of our curtailed space is needed to give them the complete supply of Irish news that they seek.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.