Galway In Days Gone By

A view across the Claddagh Basin from the tower of Galway Fire Station in the Summer of 1979. The most notable features are the derelict Fisheries Watchtower (left centre), now revamped with a new footbridge access and hosting a small fisheries museum, and the decaying McDonogh's Fertiliser premises, now the site of Jury's Hotel and a multi-storey carpark.
A view across the Claddagh Basin from the tower of Galway Fire Station in the Summer of 1979. The most notable features are the derelict Fisheries Watchtower (left centre), now revamped with a new footbridge access and hosting a small fisheries museum, and the decaying McDonogh's Fertiliser premises, now the site of Jury's Hotel and a multi-storey carpark.

1916

Negligent councillors

There was important business to be transacted by the District Council of Oughterard last Thursday, but there was no meeting for want of a quorum. It may not be out of place to remind certain councillors of their lethargy in the discharge of their duties attached to their office.

Any man seeking the office of D.C. should in justice to all concerned, attend at least eight meetings annually, i.e., the quarterly and adjourned meetings.

I heard a very reasonable question asked by some contactors, who came across Lough Corrib at considerable risk and inconvenience to tender for roads, and had to return home again with their tenders unopened: “Where are the absent councillors?”

It has very frequently happened since the last triennial elections at important meetings, and contractors who have come 20 or 30 miles to tender for roads, and spend the previous night in town, have to return home disappointed for want of a quorum.

Firearms raid

A strange raid for firearms is reported to have occurred in the village of Caherhue about four miles from Tuam, on Sunday night week. It is stated that eight young men entered the house of a small farmer named O’Dea and demanded a firearm from him. They searched the dwelling and found a gun which they took away with them. Information as to the identity of the raiders has been given and it is surmised that police action will be taken.

1941

Sunday parade

The parade of the Defence Forces and Auxiliary Services will be held in Galway on Sunday next when the salute will be taken by An Taoiseach at Eyre Square (opposite Bank of Ireland at 3.30pm). Afterwards, An Taoiseach will address the Forces and the public at the Galway Sports Ground.

Airmail service

Why should not Galway have an air mail service to and from Dublin? The Corporation sees no reason why it should not – especially as there is talk of such a service between Dublin and Cork. So, at Thursday’s meeting it was decided, on the suggestion of Mr. P. Lydon, to urge the county’s representatives in the Dáil to get busy in the matter.

Turf problem

The well-to-do of Galway can purchase large supplies of turf, the very poor are catered for by the mayor’s Fuel Fund, but the small wage-earner in the city has neither the money nor the storage space to enable him to get in supplies.

Mr. P. Cooke made the above statement at Saturday’s meeting of the Galway County Council when asking the Council to sell surplus turf to the working people at the all-in cost on a cash and carry basis.

Unauthorised shed

Galway Corporation on Thursday agreed to serve prohibition orders on two persons who, it was reported, were building sheds or garages in Devon Park without having submitted plans to the Corporation for approval. The prohibition orders are intended to have the building work stopped until plans are submitted and approved.

Road flooded

Following heavy rainfall during the weekend, many roads in Connemara were flooded on Monday. The Galway-Clifden road was flooded at many points. A motor car which got stuck in flood water between Oughterard and Ross held up traffic for some time. At this point also, the water came in the door of the morning ‘bus from Clifden to Galway. The Maam Cross-Screebe road.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.