Galway In Days Gone By

Eyre Square, Galway on a fair day probably in the 1880s. In the foreground is a horsedrawn tram setting off on the two-and-a-half-mile journey to Salthill. Operated by the Galway and Salthill Tramway Co, the tramline opened in 1879. The advertising board on the top level of the tram refers to Alexander Moon General Draper which operated for over a century in the city, latterly simply as Moons, before being taken over by Brown Thomas in 1995.
Eyre Square, Galway on a fair day probably in the 1880s. In the foreground is a horsedrawn tram setting off on the two-and-a-half-mile journey to Salthill. Operated by the Galway and Salthill Tramway Co, the tramline opened in 1879. The advertising board on the top level of the tram refers to Alexander Moon General Draper which operated for over a century in the city, latterly simply as Moons, before being taken over by Brown Thomas in 1995.

1916

Church searched

We are prohibited by the Irish Press Censor from publishing correspondence that took place between Rev. T. Burke, P.P., Kinvara, and General Sir John Maxwell on the subject below.

Every man, woman and child in Kinvara parish and district, and most people throughout Co. Galway and the West, know that Kinvara Church and Convent have been searched by armed police.

A great many well-informed people are aware that the revered parish priest, the Rev. T. Burke, has made a strong protest to General Sir John Maxwell, the Military Governor of Ireland.

The following proposal was unanimously adopted at the conference of priests of the Diocese of Kilmacduagh:

“We, the priests of the diocese of Kilmacduagh, have heard with amazement of an outrage perpetrated against the Convent of Mercy and community, Kinvara, on Sunday, 4th June, by the police, who said they came to search the convent for rebels.

“We enter out solemn protest against their search of the convent, and we say that the search, and the manner in which that search was made, was a gross outrage on religion and an uncalled-for indignity and insult to the nuns.

“Catholics well know that religious Sisters never harbour strangers or externs in their convent, and that nuns’ cells are privileged, no strangers being allowed to enter them.

“This immunity was violated by the police, and the manner in which the cells were searched was equally offensive to manliness and common decency.”

The affair at Kinvara has been grossly mishandled from the beginning, and the characteristically Prussian attitude of the new censorship in Ireland does not improve, but considerably aggravates a painful situation.

Surely the military governors of this country ought to be able to defend their own attitude, and the attitude of their subordinates, without resorting to the equivocal expedient of a clumsy endeavour to conceal from the public all the facts.

Even from their own standpoint, the attitude of the censor in this respect is extremely stupid. It makes a mystery where none existed, and renders the people suspicious of an authority that resorts to methods that are given so sinister an aspect.

1941

Turf cutters protected

Four men returned to work under Garda protection on the County Council turf scheme at Glennaun bog, Inverin of Monday. Forty-one workers are still idle.

Garda reinforcements have been drafted in from Spiddal and Carraroe and it is feared that the dispute may take a more serious turn. The strike began when fifteen workers were laid off on the plea that there was not sufficient work available for them.

The workers refused to accept this plea and pointed out that there was plenty of work on the bog for all. The dispute has now dragged on for over three weeks.

Blow to holiday traffic

The holiday traffic this year has sustained a very serious blow by the decision of the Great Southern Company not to run Sunday excursion trains. It will cause thousands of Dubliners to spend Sundays quietly in their gardens, but the demand for bicycles on the part of young people has already increased amazingly. I think there will be a scarcity of bicycles soon.

The loss of income for those dependant on the tourist business for a living will be a serious matter. But the railway company has no alternative; it has not enough coal to carry on the services.

Timber fuel dump

About ten or fifteen thousand tons of timber unsuitable for building construction or other commercial purposes are to be stored at South Park, Galway, by Fuel Importers (Eire) Ltd, a company formed for the purposes of conserving fuel supplies throughout the country. Fuel dumps are also to be established in other parts of the country.

The timber – secured through the clearing of scrub and the removal from State forests of trees unsuitable for any purpose other than firewood – will be brought into Galway from Monivea, Cong and Woodford, and will not be released for firing unless an emergency should arise.

Cycling fans

Galway 0-10 Mayo 1-5

A great effort by J. McGauren not only saved his net in the last minute of the game, but saved Galway from a point defeat at the hands of Mayo in the first round of the Connacht senior football championship at Tuam.

Several thousand people – most of them cyclists – saw Galway qualify to meet Roscommon or Sligo in the provincial final next  month.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.