Galway In Days Gone By

The Organising Committee of the Galway County Council annual dinner-dance in the Great Southern Hotel, Galway, in January 1965, were, front row, from left: Mr. John Coyne; Miss Maura Walsh, treasurer; Miss Mary Cunningham, secretary; Miss Christine Murphy and Miss Grainne Hartigan. Second row: Mr. Michael Treacy, Mr. John Dooley, Miss Anne Walshe, Mr. John Durkin, Mr. Christopher Walshe (chairman) and Mr. Sean Cullinane.
The Organising Committee of the Galway County Council annual dinner-dance in the Great Southern Hotel, Galway, in January 1965, were, front row, from left: Mr. John Coyne; Miss Maura Walsh, treasurer; Miss Mary Cunningham, secretary; Miss Christine Murphy and Miss Grainne Hartigan. Second row: Mr. Michael Treacy, Mr. John Dooley, Miss Anne Walshe, Mr. John Durkin, Mr. Christopher Walshe (chairman) and Mr. Sean Cullinane.

1918

Redmond’s death

The news of the death of the Irish Leader was received in Galway on Wednesday noon with dismay. The bulletins published in the morning papers had led his friends to cherish hopes that he would soon be restored to health; and at first the intelligence was received with incredulity.

It was only when confirmation of the news came from the National Directory that it was realised that it was all too true. City flags were floated at half-mast, and the flags at the National Club was bordered in crepe, while the blinds were drawn. Many people wore mourning badges, and a sense of profound sorrow pervaded the streets.

Tear to the eye

At Athenry Petty Sessions, Mr. Gilhooley, D.I., prosecuted Mary K. Healy, Athenry, for selling British onions without being registered as a retailer. Dr. Comyn, solr., Loughrea, appeared for the defendant and said she pleaded guilty.

She was not aware of the Order, and the moment her attention was drawn to the matter, she wrote to the Ministry of Food, applying to be registered as a retailer of potatoes. That was on February 16, and she got a reply informing her that the last date for requisition was October 8 last, and her application could not therefore be retained. Defendant was fined 1s.

1943

Bishop flays drunkards

His Lordship, the Most Rev. Dr. Browne, Bishop of Galway, stated in his Pastoral Letter: At the present time when so many important foodstuffs are scarce, there is no scarcity or rationing of strong drinks, and there is a danger that money which used formerly be spent on clothes or motor cars is not being saved up, but spent on drink.

In recent years, young people do not seem to realise that those who develop a fondness for strong drink soon become slaves to it; they do not realise the terrible effects on soul and body that result from this slavery.

Intemperance breaks down health of mind and of body; it destroys self-respect, industry and thrift; it makes bad workers and bad farmers, killers and sluggards; it brings misery into homes and corruption into public life.

The drunkard is liable to sell his country; he makes a bad soldier and a bad citizen: he is danger to democracy for his vote in the booth or in the council chamber can be bought.

Up to recent years intemperance was the vice of the male sex: it was regarded as most abnormal and most shameful in a woman. But, unfortunately, those who take their ideas from non-Catholic lands have spread the notion that it is fashionable for women and even girls to drink. The consequences of intemperance in the case of women are particularly lamentable and shameful, for it endangers her honour and virtue.

Even a small quantity of strong drink weakens reserve and modesty and has caused the downfall of girls. Intemperance in women has this other terrible consequence that it affects their children: it defiles the well-springs of the race.

Drinking among women is a sign of decadence and decay in a people. It means that the health and vitality of their children are sacrificed; and when a people tolerates this, they are already degenerate.

Parents should see to it that their children do not associate with those who are fond of drink, and they should not be afraid to use correction against their sons and daughters who break their confirmation pledge.

Better to correct them now, than see their ruin and disgrace later.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.