Galway In Days Gone By

The GBC Restaurant, Williamsgate Street, Galway in 1972. The business is still thriving at this location. On the right can be seen the shell of the fire-ravaged Corbett's General Store which was gutted in a massive city centre blaze the previous year that covered six acres and caused £2m worth of damage to 26 premises.
The GBC Restaurant, Williamsgate Street, Galway in 1972. The business is still thriving at this location. On the right can be seen the shell of the fire-ravaged Corbett's General Store which was gutted in a massive city centre blaze the previous year that covered six acres and caused £2m worth of damage to 26 premises.

1918

Daring raids

A series of daring raids for arms were made a few nights ago in the neighbourhood of Gort by a party of ten or twelve men, who were disguised and armed with guns and revolvers. The first house raided was that of Mr. Thomas Burke, Lisbrien, who happened to be visiting a neighbour.

The back door was forced open, and a gun and revolvers presented at the heads of the only occupants – two aged women and a servant boy. One of the raiding party shouted “hands up” and demanded all the arms and ammunition in the house.

Resistance was offered by one of the women, and she was held while the raiders went to Mr. Burke’s bedroom and took away two D.B. shot guns, value about £50; a small rifle; and an electric lamp. Meanwhile, the other raiders pillaged a box, and carried away 350 rounds of sporting ammunition and a hunting knife.

At about 9 o’clock on the same night, the houses of John Burke and Patk. Smith, who live at Derrykeel, about six miles from Lisbrien, were simultaneously raided, and a D.B. gun was taken from Smith’s.

Burke informed the party that his gun was at the house of a man named Fahy. At the time a card party of five men were visiting Burke, and they were all made prisoners and marched to Fahy’s house.

A halt was made at the entrance gate, and two of the raisers marched young Fahy into his father’s house and ordered him to point out his father’s and Burke’s guns.

The other prisoners were then taken into the house, and one of the raiders threatened to blow out the brains of anyone who attempted to leave until morning.

The next place visited was Cheevyenase House, from which a D.B. gun, a Sneider rifle, a small rook rifle, and a disused cavalry sword were removed. The raids have occasioned considerable alarm among the inhabitants of the districts, which were visited by the police on the following day.

1943

Road transport

One of the most serious problems with which the country is confronted at the dawn of the New Year is that of transport, especially road transport. There is virtually no hope of the petrol and rubber situation becoming easier until some time after the war has ended; on the contrary, there is every prospect of it worsening during the coming twelve months.

For these reasons, the Government considers it advisable to force all the privately-owned lorries off the roads and to confer a transport monopoly upon the Great Southern Railways Company. Apart from the general objection to monopolies of any sort, there are many reasons why this course does not meet with the approval of the public and they were very clearly and forcibly set forth at the recent meeting in Galway City of more than three hundred garage proprietors, lorry owners, drivers, helpers and leading merchants.

Gallant rescue

Bartley Folan, Upper Abbeygate-street, was the hero of a thrilling rescue at New Docks shortly after noon on Christmas Eve, when Kevin Connolly (3 ½), of Buttermilk Lane, accidentally fell into the Commercial Dock. Attracted by the cries of the boy’s companions, Folan dived into the dock fully clothed and brought the lad ashore.

Passersby, who included Miss Crowley, Queen-street, a member of the Galway Branch, Irish Red Cross Society, applied artificial respiration while Dr. Thomas Powell was being summoned and, after receiving attention, young Connolly was removed to his home in the ambulance. He had fully recovered on the following day.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.