Galway In Days Gone By

The Killanin team which won the Junior County Football Championship in 1967. Back row, from left: Sean Walsh, Pete O’Connor, Pat O’Halloran, Miko Osborne, Pat O’Connor, Pake Walsh, Christy Fahy, Michael O’Connor, Michael Geraghty. Front row: Tom O’Connor (supporter), Frank Ryan, Marty Walsh, Roger O’Connor, Tom Walsh, Jack Kinnevey, Paddy O’Halloran, Joe Fahy, Pat Ryan.
The Killanin team which won the Junior County Football Championship in 1967. Back row, from left: Sean Walsh, Pete O’Connor, Pat O’Halloran, Miko Osborne, Pat O’Connor, Pake Walsh, Christy Fahy, Michael O’Connor, Michael Geraghty. Front row: Tom O’Connor (supporter), Frank Ryan, Marty Walsh, Roger O’Connor, Tom Walsh, Jack Kinnevey, Paddy O’Halloran, Joe Fahy, Pat Ryan.

1917

Shot near Oranmore

At ten o’clock on Sunday night, Mr. Luke Flynn, of Ballycottage, near Oranmore, was fired at by an ambush party and wounded, but, fortunately, not seriously. Flynn is a young man, whose father, Mr. Michael Flynn, holds farms in County Galway and elsewhere.

As he was passing cross roads, within a quarter of a mile from his home, a shot suddenly rang out from behind him, and he felt a sharp pain in his right hip. He fell to the ground, while his assailant is said to have escaped across the fields. It is not known whether the assailant was alone, but there seems little reason to suppose that there was anyone on the scene except the person who fired the shot.

Young Flynn lay on the roadside for a considerable time, until the young son of a neighbour came along, and assisted him to his house. He was attended by Dr. Gannon, of Oranmore, who extricated a number of pellets from his hip.

Fortunately, Flynn was wearing heavy clothing at the time of the shooting or the result might have been much more serious. The curious part of the outrage appears to be the difficulty in ascribing any immediate notice for the occurrence that might have ended tragically.

Trawler burned

On Thursday night the trawler ‘Majestic’, the property of Messrs. McDonogh, went ablaze in the Bay. The origin of the fire is mysterious, and this morning (Friday), the remnants of the trawler are still smouldering. The tonnage of the trawler was fifty, and its last trip was on Monday when it returned after an exciting experience.

1942

More money than ever

The people of Galway have tons of money to spend, but we have not got all the goods they want to buy. This sums up the Christmas shopping situation so far as Galway traders are concerned. Drapers interviewed by our special representative were of divergent opinions about sales, but all agreed that there was “more money than ever” in circulation.

Grocers agreed on the same point, but deplored the fact that they could not supply the people with any of the usual Christmas “extras”, such as fruit and plum puddings.

An interesting fact elicited by our representative was that a great many of the gifts purchased this year will be sold in sombre brown paper instead of in the usual fancy cardboard boxes decorated with tinsel and vivid in colouring.

Messrs. McCambridge Ltd., grocers, Shop-street, said that people were buying less this year for the simple reason the goods were not there for them to buy despite the fact that those shopping had plenty of money. They had plenty of biscuits in stock, but as far as fruit, tinned or otherwise, was concerned, or any of the usual Christmas novelties, they were not to be had.

Messrs. McNamara and Co. Ltd., grocers, Colonial Buildings, said that the people would buy more if the goods were to be had. All the usual Christmas novelties were conspicuous by their absence. Such goods as plum puddings, crackers, chocolates, Christmas stockings, etc., were only to be had in small quantities.

There is another angle to the Christmas shopping, writes our representative, which should not be lost sight of. There will be a lot of waste paper floating around over the Christmas and it should be all carefully saved and brought to the Connacht Tribune office, where the Government prices will be paid for it. All waste such as wrappings, cards and envelopes will be gratefully received and paid for.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.