Galway In Days Gone By

The 1970 Galway Intermediate Hurling Team that lost the All-Ireland Semi Final to an Antrim team that was trained by Justin McCarthy, with the Galway Team containing future Rugby Captain of Connacht, Ireland and British & Irish Lions Teams, Ciaran Fitzgerald.Back Row (from left): Tommy Ryan (Tommie Larkins); Padraic Hobbs (Killimor); Mike Ryan (Craughwell); Frank Burke (Turloughmore); Ray Duffy (Athenry); Tom O’Hara (Killimor); Mick McTigue (Ballindereen); Timmy Cahalan (Mullagh); Davy Fahy (Kilbeacanty); Paul Kilkenny (Killimoredaly); Joe Gillane (Gort). Front Row (l to r): Martin Smyth (Loughrea); Johnnie Kelly (Abbey); Mike Deeley (Kilbeacanty); Pat Donoghue (Capt. St.Thomas’s); Mike Fahy (Turloughmore); John Norris (Killimor); Ciaran Fitzgerald (Loughrea); Andy Fenton (Kiltormer).
The 1970 Galway Intermediate Hurling Team that lost the All-Ireland Semi Final to an Antrim team that was trained by Justin McCarthy, with the Galway Team containing future Rugby Captain of Connacht, Ireland and British & Irish Lions Teams, Ciaran Fitzgerald.Back Row (from left): Tommy Ryan (Tommie Larkins); Padraic Hobbs (Killimor); Mike Ryan (Craughwell); Frank Burke (Turloughmore); Ray Duffy (Athenry); Tom O’Hara (Killimor); Mick McTigue (Ballindereen); Timmy Cahalan (Mullagh); Davy Fahy (Kilbeacanty); Paul Kilkenny (Killimoredaly); Joe Gillane (Gort). Front Row (l to r): Martin Smyth (Loughrea); Johnnie Kelly (Abbey); Mike Deeley (Kilbeacanty); Pat Donoghue (Capt. St.Thomas’s); Mike Fahy (Turloughmore); John Norris (Killimor); Ciaran Fitzgerald (Loughrea); Andy Fenton (Kiltormer).

1917

Milk profiteers

In the promulgation of its various orders fixing the prices of foodstuffs, the Government has shown callous indifference to the needs of the poor by its negligence in regulating a maximum price for milk. During the week, many of the women vendors in the city notified their customers that they had advanced the price from 4d to 5d per quart.

No change has been made at the milk depot, but as its daily supply is limited, hundreds of poor people will be compelled to pay the profiteers’ price. In the interests of the destitute poor and their families, immediate action should be taken to prevent the imposition of an additional financial tax on their slender earnings.

Animal cruelty

At the monthly meeting of Tuam Town Commissioners, the Department of Agriculture wrote respecting the ill-treatment to which cattle were subjected in their removal, as is at present the practice from the fair green at Tuam to the railway station through the principal street of the town, instead of by the circular route agreed on some time ago.

The whole main street from the railway station to the fair green was packed with cattle and as attempts were made to open the gate, indescribable scenes of cruelty occurred in the rush made to get the cattle through the gates.

This cruelty occurred not alone at the level crossing, but along the whole length of the streets – a regular orgy of beating taking place in order to rush the cattle to get to the place of entraining.

In one rush, he observed four cattle struck down, and were it not for the efforts of the sergeant and some constables, who, at considerable risk to themselves, forced back some of the cattle, these animals would probably have been killed. He was informed that some of the cattle had arrived at their destination dead in the trucks.

1942

Typhus epidemic

Strong condemnation of the obstructive tactics adopted by some people in the typhus infected area of Connemara was voiced by the Very Rev. N. Donnelly, P.P., Spiddal, at the 11 o’clock Mass on Sunday. Father Donnelly specially condemned the blocking of a road in front of an ambulance at Derryloughlin. Obstructive tactics have since ceased.

The present epidemic in the Spiddal area has had far-reaching repercussions, and the Department is believed to be determined to make a thorough clean-up. Migrant workers from the area are suspected of being responsible for outbreaks of the disease in England and Northern Ireland this year.

Blood tests carried out on some of these are stated to have proved “positive”. Hence the restrictions on migrants leaving the affected areas.

When the ambulance called at infected homes, many of the occupants were absent, and it is believed that some of them had “gone on the run”. Gardaí reinforcements were again on duty during the day both with the ambulance and at the temporary disinfecting station in Spiddal Irish College.

Blood tests have disclosed that an alarmingly big percentage of those examined have been infected at some time or other within the past few months. It is when such positive results have been found that the medical authorities carry out the disinfecting operations which have been meeting with such senseless opposition. Over 130 contacts have been dealt with at the disinfecting station.

Bring home the bacon

Provision shopkeepers all over the country are to have extra supplies of bacon and ham for Christmas. The extra quantities are being made available out of reserves accumulated by the Pigs and Bacon Commission.

The quantity is to be calculated so as to enable shopkeepers to obtain fifty per cent of the supplies they obtained at the same time last year.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.