Galway In Days Gone By

At the opening of the extension to the Franciscan Brothers' Agricultural College in Mountbellew in September 1975. The opening of the €400,000 extension was performed by the Taoiseach, Liam Cosgrave. The project involved the demolition of certain sections of the old existing college and the provision of new classrooms, library, science laboratory, gymnasium, sleeping and catering facilities.
Mountbellew 1975At the opening of the extension to the Franciscan Brothers' Agricultural College in Mountbellew in September 1975. The opening of the €400,000 extension was performed by the Taoiseach, Liam Cosgrave. The project involved the demolition of certain sections of the old existing college and the provision of new classrooms, library, science laboratory, gymnasium, sleeping and catering facilities.

1917

A cowardly practice

For some time past, a large number of dogs have been found poisoned in the streets of the city. Last week, a valuable dog, the property of Mr. W.E. Binns, B.E., was destroyed. The poison is laid in the principal streets on bread and meat. Such a cruel proceeding is strongly to be condemned.

Price of light

Indignation continues to be expressed by consumers in the town at the increase in the price of electric light. A movement is on foot to call a public meeting in the Town Hall to protest against the increase, and to appoint a deputation to wait on the Manager in regard to the matter.

Cocks ablaze

On Friday night, at about 10 o’clock, four cocks of hay, the property of Mr. Hugh Fahy, went on fire at Terryland near the waterworks. Mr. Molloy, the Town Steward, and the Fire Brigade, assisted by the police, were soon at the scene of the conflagration, and set to work to subdue the flames. They succeeded in saving a number of stacks of corn, but the hay was completely destroyed. A claim for £150 malicious injury was lodged at the meeting of Galway Urban Council on Thursday by Mr. Fahy.

A great catch

The Claddagh Fishing Fleet has been having the time of its life during the week. Thirty boards were out on Tuesday night, and returned with a magnificent take of herring, the principal shoals being caught in the Ardfry district. It is an interesting fact that the ordinary fishing boats outdid the C.D. Board trawlers, inasmuch as the principal takes were obtained in the shallow waters of Ardfry, where the deeper nets of the trawlers could not be utilised. This is the first time since the ceremony of blessing the waters of the Bay took place a month ago that there has been any successful herring fishing, and the swarthy and energetic sailors of the Claddagh are availing of the advantage gained with energy. Herrings were sold in Galway for export at 17s. and 18s. per cwt., as compared with 5s. and 6s. per cwt. in pre-war times. Some men who had shares in the boats made as much as £1/5s. on their single night’s fishing.

1942

Make roads safe

The importance of repairing the small roads of the county and making the main roads safe for horse traffic was discussed by the meeting of Galway County Council. Co. Manager Mr. O’Flynn pointed out that if they left the road margins untarred that the roads would rapidly deteriorate.

Mr. O’Kelly said that they had a better type of road in Tipperary – a road on which horses could travel in safety.

The County Surveyor said that he had laid the Threadneedle Road in Galway with creo-phalt and he could lay other roads with creo-phalt as was done in Tipperary, but the Council had refused to allow him the money – it would mean more expenditure.

Mr. Beegan said that if the County Surveyor had explained that matter more clearly to the Council in the past, they would have been more generous.

County Surveyor: For the past 18 years, I have been bringing forward that proposal to make the roads non-slippery. I will have it in my estimate again.

Ballinasloe Show success

An increase in the number of entries in the horse, cattle, garden and home industries sections of Ballinasloe Show on Monday and Tuesday more than offset a decline in the entries in the farm and poultry sections, and the total number of exhibits was over one thousand, and higher than last year’s figure.

Widespread potato rot

Further reports of potato rot continue to come in from an increasing number of areas in Connemara. Although digging operations have not yet commenced on a large scale, the indications are that the rot has been fairly widespread and alarming.

Reports from Carna and the Aran Islands are almost as disquieting as those from the Carraroe and Lettermore areaas. Unfortunately, the flour supply in the latter areas is still anything but satisfactory and strict rationing is being exercised by the storekeepers.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.