Galway In Days Gone By

The Galway Senior Hurling team which defeated Kilkenny by 3-5 to 1-10 at Croke Park in the All-Ireland Semi-Final of 1953. Galway subsequently lost the final to Cork by a point (3-3 to 0-8) in controversial circumstances. Back, from left: J Gallagher, J Duggan, J Killeen, C Corless, B O’Neill, E Quinn, J Molloy, H Gordon. Front: P Nolan, S Duggan, M Glynn, M Burke, S Ruane, B Duffy, J Brophy.
The Galway Senior Hurling team which defeated Kilkenny by 3-5 to 1-10 at Croke Park in the All-Ireland Semi-Final of 1953. Galway subsequently lost the final to Cork by a point (3-3 to 0-8) in controversial circumstances. Back, from left: J Gallagher, J Duggan, J Killeen, C Corless, B O’Neill, E Quinn, J Molloy, H Gordon. Front: P Nolan, S Duggan, M Glynn, M Burke, S Ruane, B Duffy, J Brophy.

1917

Pulling up cabbages

At Galway Petty Sessions, Michael Stokes, Munster Lane, summoned Mrs. Mary Browne, and her husband, John, for abusive language. Stokes complained that he was putting down cabbage plants when John Browne came out and pulled them up, and said the garden was his. Mrs. Browne also entered upon the scene and gave abuse to the complainant.

A constable said he visited the scene, and he saw no trace of plants having been pulled up. The Chairman said he understood that Browne had received a medal for rescuing somebody from the docks. The cases would be dismissed.

Troublesome school run

At the same Petty Sessions, Thomas N. Joyce, James-st., Westport, was charged under the Petrol Restrictions Order with permitting a motor car to be used other than for business purposes. Const. Aughlin stated that he stopped the defendant’s car at William-street on the 7th September, and it was being driven by a man named Loftus. The chauffeur said he had conveyed two young boys named McEvoy to St. Mary’s College, Galway, but witness did not see the boys.

Mr. O’Dea: Did he tell you that they had consulted with the police in Westport, and that they were told by them that they were entitled to use the car for that purpose?

– I do not remember.

Mr. O’Dea said this was clearly a business purpose. It was the public duty of parents to educate their children.

Mr. Hildebrand, D.I., said that the train was available.

Chairman: The question is: is it a business purpose to bring the boys to school? We think it is. We are bound to dismiss the case.

1942

Seaside suburb

Everybody who is interested in the development of Galway’s seaside suburb as a holiday centre will welcome the proceedings at the annual meeting of the local branch of the Irish Tourist Association as a move in the right direction.

In referring recently to the scheme now afoot for the development of Tramore we wrote: “It is only by local energy, initiative and enterprise that local development can come. The Tourist Board must be presented with a sound practical and remunerative scheme at the earliest possible moment.” Monday’s meeting took this advice to heart and appointed a special committee to meet the County and Borough Surveyors with a view of preparing a scheme for submission to the Tourist Board.

Nobody can understand the needs of Salthill and the possibilities of the place better than the people of Galway and Salthill themselves. It is for them to say what shall be done and – even more important – what shall not be done. They must not allow themselves to be rushed into approval of some grandiose scheme which, instead of improving the situation, might turn this beautiful seafront into a tawdry imitation of a vulgar tenth rate cross-Channel resort.

We should not allow ourselves to be obsessed by the English trippers’ ideal, but should look farther afield for our model and endeavour to build up a place worthy of the dignified beauty of its surroundings which, at the same time, will possess all the amenities that holidaymakers have every right to expect.

It should be quite easy to do this and at the same time to make the project a profitable one so that the Irish Tourist Board will be assured of repayment and the people of this city will possess a seaside resort second to none in these islands which will prove a source of pride and profit during all the years to come.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.