Galway In Days Gone By

Galway was en fete for the visit of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra to the city in 1903. This photo from the National Library of Ireland collection was taken as the large crowds dispersed some time after the royal couple had passed through the town centre on their way to Galway Docks where the Royal Yacht awaited them. On left a carriageman awaits the return of his employer.
Galway was en fete for the visit of King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra to the city in 1903. This photo from the National Library of Ireland collection was taken as the large crowds dispersed some time after the royal couple had passed through the town centre on their way to Galway Docks where the Royal Yacht awaited them. On left a carriageman awaits the return of his employer.

1917

A courageous act

Eye witnesses of the incident are loud in their praise of the action of Constable Carragy, of Eglinton-st. barracks, who on Saturday evening was instrumental in saving the life of a young lad. The constable was on duty at the Four Corners, and traffic was rather heavy.

A young lad, named James Conneely, of Newtownsmith, came out of Upper Abbeygate-street wheeling a hand cart. As soon as he came out of Abbeygate-street he was knocked down by a horse and cart, and the hand cart he was wheeling was thrown on top of him.

A motor car was coming at a rather fast speed down William-street and was dangerously near young Conneely when Constable Carragy rushed in, and was just in time to lift the boy up out of the way of the motor. Only for the constable’s action, Conneely would have been run over with serious consequences. Constable Carragy was struck on the side by the motor car.

Races turn-out

The weather was beautifully fine for the Galway Races on Wednesday and Thursday, and the crowd, although not as large as in former years, was large. The going was in capital order – in fact, it seldom has been better at the venue – but the fields on the first day, with the exception of the Plate, were on the small side. On Thursday, however, the fields showed a great improvement.

The absence of motor cars, owing to the recent order of the Board of Trade, was an important, but to the jarveys, a welcome feature of the races. This year there was a change in the route to the course. There is a new road leading to the field, but it is far from being an improvement on the route. The long line of cars got congested, and people were held up in the boreen for a long period. With a little supervision and control, the continual blockade could have been avoided. Hundreds were late for the first races owing to the confusion in this respect.

1942

Dust and sand

Galway visitors to Dublin recently complained of the dust storms in the metropolis. One Galway girl had to be treated in the Mater Hospital for dust injury to an eye. Commended one of our jaundiced local legislators when he heard it: “Dublin has often tried to throw dust in our eyes, but this is the first time it has succeeded.”

Talking of dust recalls the County Council’s gallant effort to cope with the sandstorms on the Grattan Road. Everybody in Galway and Salthill knows the way sand blows across that road and piles up on landward side. Well, somebody connected with the County Council decided the other day that it might be as well to clear away some of the sand before the road vanished altogether at certain points.

So they tackled the job. They brought along a horse cart and shovelled the sand into it. When the cart was full, they moved it over to the seaward side of the road and dumped the sand there. And of course, the next strong wind from the Atlantic blew the whole lot back again and added a few more cart-loads for good measure.

It looks like being a permanent job for somebody.

Jail for purse theft

For stealing a purse from Mrs. Moran, N.T., Claddagh N.S., at Galway market on Saturday, Timothy O’Sullivan, of no fixed abode, was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labour by District Justice W.P. Cahill at a special court in Galway today.

Obey the L.S.F.

Members of the L.S.F. in Galway will assist the Garda Síochána in the regulation of traffic during the Race Days. The public are requested to accept and comply with their directions as readily as they would comply with the directions given by the Gardaí.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.