Galway In Days Gone By

St Joseph's Youth Club volleyball team, Shantalla, who defeated St Augustine's in the final of the Old Galway for People Festival in St. Mary's College in November 1974. Seated (from left): Sindy Dowling, Alaco Sullivan, Fidelma Kavanagh (captain) and Ann Concannon. Standing: Mary Lally, Julie Sullivan, Mary Folan, Margaret Connolly, Mary Smith and Carmel Rigney.
St Joseph's Youth Club volleyball team, Shantalla, who defeated St Augustine's in the final of the Old Galway for People Festival in St. Mary's College in November 1974. Seated (from left): Sindy Dowling, Alaco Sullivan, Fidelma Kavanagh (captain) and Ann Concannon. Standing: Mary Lally, Julie Sullivan, Mary Folan, Margaret Connolly, Mary Smith and Carmel Rigney.

1917

Race Week

The proposed ban of the Government upon racing was looked upon by the people of Galway with something approaching dismay.      In a resolution passed at The Galway Urban District Council some six weeks ago protesting against the stoppage of Galway Races, it was pointed out that the holding of this annual event meant, at least, the spending    of £10,000 in the City and its environs, and that the community would be so hard hit if  no races were allowed, that, considerable poverty would be bound to result.

To those who do not understand the conditions that obtain in a poor town like Galway, this seems in the nature of an exaggeration. The simple fact is, however, that the revenue reaped from visitors during Race Week provides the wherewithal to carry no inconsiderable section of our population over the winter. Fortunately, the universal protest that went up has prevailed, and Galway Races for 1917 will be held on Wednesday/Thursday, August 1/2.

As the Racing Calendar now falls out, it will be the last autumn event in Ireland this year, and also it will be the biggest. The entries closed on Wednesday last, and for the 12 events of the two days’ meeting they total 244.

Having regard to the fact that only half the bloodstock is being now maintained in training, this is a splendid record. When the entries for the Military Race, which it is proposed to run on the 1st day, are closed, it is expected that the total number of entries will be as large as in any previous year.

For the celebrated Galway Plate, 42 horses have been entered, so we may take it that this classic event will show a big field.

1942

Publicity for Galway

Frequent complaint has been made that tourist publicity for Galway leaves much to be desired. Certainly little or no effort has been made to stress this ancient city’s distinctive personality; its historical interest; its old world charm and picturesque vistas, its unique position as a holiday centre. Most of the publicity bestowed upon Galway, in fact, has had a beautiful vagueness which would have fitted equally well a hundred other places.

For this reason we welcome the appearance of the two articles from the Irish Tourist Association’s bright monthly, Irish Travel. True, Race Week has been “written up” repeatedly (though, perhaps, not with such verve and colour) but the aspect of the city with which the ‘Lady Visitor’ deals has remained virtually untouched. ‘The Glamour of Galway’, in other words, has not been capitalised as it should have been.

Haulage charges

Mr. George Lee, County Surveyor, told Mr. Sonny Cooke at a meeting of the Galway County Council’s Finance Committee that the Great Southern Railways Company were paid a higher rate than private lorry owners for the haulage of turf over roads. The private lorry owners were “suckers” to work for a lower price, Mr. Cooke said. He protested against the discrimination.

Contagious disease

Galway is as safe as possible from sea-borne disease of a contagious character. At the port, elaborate precautions are taken and the utmost vigilance is maintained to safeguard the citizens. These reassuring statements are the result of inquiries made by our representatives in consequence of somewhat disconcerting pronouncements made recently by medical authorities in other parts of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.