Galway In Days Gone By

Reverend Peadar Moran, Monivea, with members of his family after his ordination at St Patrick’s College, Carlow, on Saturday, June 12, 1965. Fr Moran, the youngest of 14 children, was educated at St Joseph’s College, Galway, before going to Carlow. Front row, from left: Michael, Sister Gaudentia, Mr Moran, Rev Peadar Moran, Mrs Moran, Sister Maurice. Second row, from left: Fr Michael (Los Angeles), George, Deirdre, Joseph and Fr Frank (Los Angeles). Back row, from left: William, Eileen, May and Patrick.
Reverend Peadar Moran, Monivea, with members of his family after his ordination at St Patrick’s College, Carlow, on Saturday, June 12, 1965. Fr Moran, the youngest of 14 children, was educated at St Joseph’s College, Galway, before going to Carlow. Front row, from left: Michael, Sister Gaudentia, Mr Moran, Rev Peadar Moran, Mrs Moran, Sister Maurice. Second row, from left: Fr Michael (Los Angeles), George, Deirdre, Joseph and Fr Frank (Los Angeles). Back row, from left: William, Eileen, May and Patrick.

1917

Drowned in quarry

The body of Thomas Feene, a farmer, aged 28, residing in Shantalla, was found drowned in a quarry hole a quarter-of-a-mile from his residence, at 10 o’clock on Friday night.

The circumstances under which the late man met his death are not quite clear. In the best of health, and, according to his wife and relatives, unoppressed by any care or anxiety, he left his residence at 6 o’clock on Friday morning in order to bring in the cows from a field near the quarry. This was the last occasion on which he was seen alive by his relatives.

About 6.30, a girl named Miss Mary Lee, of Shantalla, a munition worker, returning from duty, met the deceased, who was whistling and appeared in the best of humour. She was the last to see the unfortunate man alive. As he did not return with the cows, his father got uneasy. He went out to the field, but could not find his son. A number of friends were notified of the condition of affairs that existed, and a search of the neighbourhood was made, but without result.

A stick, which was supposed to have been carried by the deceased was found near the quarry hole, which was dragged, and after some time, the body was discovered. The deceased man’s trousers were torn, as if he struggled violently to climb up the side of the rock. His cap was missing and it was surmised that as the morning was breezy, it fell off near the hole, and that in making an effort to save it, he fell accidentally into the hole, which contains about 45ft of water, and which is altogether unprotected.

Without assistance, it would be impossible for a person to get out of the water, but at the hour that the unfortunate man met his death, no one would be near to hear his cries and to render help. A sad feature of the tragedy is that the deceased had been only three months married. Sympathy will be generally tendered to the young widow in the awful sorrow that has overtaken her.

1942

Galway Races dead cert

Rumours prevalent in the city during the weekend that the Galway Races would not take place this year were quickly dispelled by Mr. J.S. Young, Chairman of the Galway Race committee, who told our representative that not only will the famous Galway two-day meeting be held, but there will be seven races each day instead of six as heretofore, and the prize money for the Galway Plate will again be £1,000.

Salthill raft replacement

The Galway Corporation at a special meeting on Friday to provide new lifebuoys at Salthill and to purchase five timber barrels to replace five of the steel drums which supported the raft at Blackrock and were now unfit to use. The Borough Surveyor, who recommended the purchase, pointed out that it was now impossible to get steel drums. It was also decided that the Borough Surveyor should submit an estimate of the cost of repairing the concrete platform in front of the ladies’ boxes. The platform, the Borough Surveyor said, was badly smashed up at one place and next winter’s gales would probably finish it if it were not repaired.

Battery radio invention

Mr. P. Smith, of Messrs. P. Smith and Son, radio engineers, Galway, has just succeeded in perfecting an invention which, he says will solve the dry battery problem for owners of battery radio sets. It is a small electrical gadget driven by a four-volt wet battery and he claims that when it is attached to a radio, it dispenses with the need for a dry high tension battery. This week, he constructed one of them in the presence of a Connacht Tribune reporter. He calls it “Smith’s High Tension Unit” and he has already applied for patent rights.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.