Galway In Days Gone By

The owners of Forde's Garage in Prospect Hill, Galway came up with a novel solution to power their petrol pumps during the ESB strike of April 1972 – an employee on a bicycle attached to the pump by a fan-belt type device pedalled furiously to generate the power to pump the fuel much to the satisfaction of customers.
The owners of Forde's Garage in Prospect Hill, Galway came up with a novel solution to power their petrol pumps during the ESB strike of April 1972 – an employee on a bicycle attached to the pump by a fan-belt type device pedalled furiously to generate the power to pump the fuel much to the satisfaction of customers.

1917

Plunkett manifesto burned

At the weekly meeting of the Portumna Board of Guardians on Saturday, a circular of Count Plunkett was read.

Chairman: He wants to have to parties in Ireland. He has nothing to do but sending those circulars through the country.

Clerk: He asks you to appoint members to the conference.

Chairman: A conference of factionists.

Mr. Carr: Burn it. We want no party but Redmond’s Party.

Mr. Morrissey: As Wm. O’Brien, in the good old days, said to Balfour’s proclamation: “Send it to blazes”.

Chairman: Plunkett and his Party will get no footing in Galway.

Mr Corr: Throw the circular into the fire.

The circular was then burned. Mr. Morrissey proposed, and Mr Joseph Carr seconded, a vote of confidence in the Irish Party.

Mr. Morrissey: When the Irish party was fighting Clanricarde and the landlords of Ireland, where was Count Plunkett? It was mainly through the efforts of the Irish Party that Clanricarde was expropriated (hear, hear). The resolution was unanimously passed.

Prisoners released

An enthusiastic reception was accorded the prisoners who arrived in Tuam, on Wednesday by the afternoon train, after 31 days’ imprisonment in Galway for the breaking up by ploughing of lands situated at Kilgeverin, and in the possession of Mr. J.D. Blake, Brooklawn, Tuam.

The following resolution was passed: “That we, the members of the Kilbannon, Milltown and Tuam branches of the United Irish League, welcome back to freedom our soldiers of the land war, and we heartily congratulate them on their spirit of Irish manliness and their determination to obtain the lands from which their forefathers were evicted and now in the possession of a middle man.”

1942

Drastic bus cuts

Drastic cuts in Galway City and Salthill ’bus services will come into operation on Monday next, 13th inst. New timetables for these routes and for a large area in the West operating to and from Galway were fixed at a meeting of officials held in Transport House yesterday which was attended by Mr. J.W. Rattray, manager of the Galway area.

The principal changes are as follows: the elimination of all country services on Sundays. In order to prolong the life of the tyres – and the vehicles – the speed of ‘buses on all routes will be reduced so that journeys will take longer in future. In Galway and Salthill there will be a less frequent service in the slack hours, but the peak-hour traffic will be continued.

Further cuts were foreshadowed by Mr. Lemass, Minister for Supplies, in a broadcast on Thursday night. He pointed out that the present inconveniences would last as long as the war – and possibly for years afterwards – and that conditions would probably get much worse before they got better.

Stressing the necessity for stopping all non-essential transport now, he said that the maintenance of transport facilities by road and rail for turf, wheat, beet and other traffics was essential to the avoidance of hardship, even famine.

Further curtailments of road services would be announced during the next few weeks. Practically all country Sunday services would cease. We could not avoid a shortage of transport, he said, but we could reduce it, and might be able, by strict economy now, to delay the day of complete stoppage.

Summer Time

“Double British Summer Time” began in Britain and Northern Ireland on Sunday, but the time in the Twenty-six Counties remains unchanged. British time is now two hours ahead of Greenwich.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.