Donegal band Little Hours look set to hit the big time

John Doherty and Ryan McCloskey of Little Hours.
John Doherty and Ryan McCloskey of Little Hours.

The Groove Tube  with Jimi McDonnell – tribunegroove@live.ie

Little Hours, a Donegal duo with a great ear for a tune and a melody, come to Monroe’s Live on Friday, October 20. The band is made up of John Doherty on piano and vocal, with Ryan McCloskey adding guitars and backing vocals. And this duo are being tipped for big things,

Their most recent offering, the EP Too Much Patience, is on the Sony RCA label and has a polished ambition that brings the work of Coldplay to mind. But how did John’s songs come to the attention of a major label?

“We won a competition to play at the Electric Picnic a few years ago,” John says. “Through that we found our manager, even though it was a small tent we were playing in. He sort of guided us in the way things work, gig wise and release wise.

“We ended up doing a headline show in Dublin that somehow sold out – don’t know how we did that! There was a wee bit of a buzz about us, and it made its way over to the UK and the president of Sony RCA came over to see us at that gig.   He offered us a deal then, it was as simple as that!”

Having the head of one of the majors must have been pretty nerve-wracking.

“We didn’t know he was there until afterwards – which was great! It was one of our first gigs as it was, so were nervous enough anyway. I’m glad I didn’t know he was there beforehand.”

But John and Ryan are now settled into being full-time musicians and by the sounds of it they enjoyed the process of recording Too Much Patience.

“Parts of it were done up here in Donegal, but most of it was done over in Leeds in a studio called Chairworks,” John says. “We did the bulk of it there, but mixed it in Donegal, in Attaca Studios. We added a bit to it and put the finishing touches to it at home. It was nice to be able to do that.”

Attaca Studios is run by Tommy McLoughlin, who has made some memorable appearance playing with Villagers. But it’s his work as a producer and engineer that’s really starting to get him noticed.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.