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130 Galway homes could be flattened to pave way for bypass

Dara Bradley

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House Demolition

As many as 130 homes could have to be demolished to make way for the proposed new Galway City ring-road.
The proponents of the project, who have been working on it for over a year, have not yet made public the maps for the five new corridors for the new bypass that are under consideration.
But they have conceded that homes in the villages of Barna and Menlo will bear the brunt of the impact, as well as Dangan, Bushypark, Newcastle, Westside and Terryland, as the proposed routes of the new road cut through communities.
Some 300 homeowners have received letters informing them that their dwellings are along the corridors – it has been conceded that regardless of which route is picked between 30 and 130 houses will be demolished.
Galway County Council are driving the bypass project, which is now called N6 Galway City Transport Project, since the Galway City Outer Bypass (GCOB) was dropped following failure to get the go-ahead after European court decisions.
Fresh plans for the possible new bypass along a different route were outlined to City and County Councillors this week by representatives of Arup, a private consultancy, and the roads and transport section of the County Council.
Seven options are being considered – five are new route options for a ring road traversing the Corrib, one involves a public transport solution only, and the other option is upgrading the existing N6 through the city.
“Approximately 300 people will be notified that their dwellings may be within a potential route corridor for this project,” said Michael Timmins senior engineer at Galway County Council.
He said that as of yet all seven options have equal status – a preferred option will be chosen by April following public consultation.
City Councillor Pádraig Conneely said: “We have been told that under any of the five corridors, between 30 and 130 homes will be knocked. We acknowledge that there is a serious traffic problem in the city but any of the options under consideration will have a massive impact on people’s homes and properties and their lives and communities,” he said.

For more on this story, see the Galway City Tribune.

CITY TRIBUNE

2020 still far short of private funding target

Dara Bradley

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Galway 2020, the company set-up to deliver the European Capital of Culture next year, remains well behind on its target of raising €6.75 million in private funding.

Making Waves, the bid book that won Galway the designation, committed Galway 2020 to raising income totalling €6.75 million from private sponsors and philanthropists.

The bid book specified that this was income to be spent on operating expenditure for the year-long programme of events.

With less than a month to go before the official programme is unveiled, Galway 2020 declined this week to confirm how much money it has raised through sponsorship.

Galway 2020 has consistently said that it intends to raise €6.75m in sponsorship; and this figure has been quoted in several briefing documents prepared for Culture Minister Josepha Madigan, which were released to the Galway City Tribune under Freedom of Information (FOI).

A briefing note for Minister Madigan dated April 10, 2019, under the heading, ‘philanthropy’, mentioned that some €133,477 had been received in total by Galway 2020 in sponsorship and in-kind support as of December 31, 2018.

In March 2019, a financial report by Galway 2020, confirmed that the company had raised less than €30,000 in private sponsorship income last year. This suggests that some €100,000 of the total raised last year, was in-kind.

When asked to clarify how much cash it has raised from sponsorship, minus in-kind support, Galway 2020 said its “fundraising target hasn’t changed”.

“The current value of the fundraising and partnerships pipeline is €4.5m – this includes a combination of commercial as well as trusts and foundations, comprising funds already committed, proposals submitted and further partnerships that are under consideration. These proposals and agreements are a combination of cash and in-kind support,” it said.

Galway 2020 declined to elaborate on how much of this €4.5 million “pipeline” was income and how much was in-kind support. It also did not say how much of that “pipeline” is already ‘banked’, and how much was not yet collected.

Included in that €4.5 million figure was a “significant corporate partnership with Medtronic”, which has become the health partner of Galway 2020 and sponsor of its Wave Maker volunteer programme, it said. However, Galway 2020 did not elaborate on the cash value – as opposed to any in-kind value – of that agreement, which was announced a fortnight ago.

“The nature of the breakdown of partnership agreements are commercially sensitive to each of our partners,” a spokesperson said.

The sole mention of the term “in-kind” in the bid book is on page 89, where it states: “The Promotion & Marketing budget described above will be supplemented by in-kind marketing benefit from our supporters, strategic partners & producers.”

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

120 households facing eviction

Dara Bradley

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Low-income city households are staring down the barrel of homelessness after a flood of eviction notices were issued this Summer.

Galway City Council has confirmed that landlords have issued a total of 120 Notices to Quit to families and single people in June and July. Twelve were on RAS (Rental Accommodation Scheme) or Long-Term Leasing, and the remaining 108 were on HAP (Housing Assistance Payment) or other social schemes in the private rental sector.

All 120 are on the Council housing wait list, but anecdotally, scores more private tenants have been issued with notices to vacate their apartments and houses – adding more fuel to the ongoing crisis.

The 120-plus evicted tenants are now in the market to find alternative rental accommodation, and are competing with the thousands of third level students who are back in the city this month searching for digs.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Rowing club resists plans for College Bar canopy

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The development of a canopy outside the bar at NUIG is being challenged by a local rowing club on the grounds that some of its elderly members feel intimidated by the drinkers who use the facility.

Concerns relate to the access to the Eglinton Canal –  it was stated that the erection of the new structure would increase the number of patrons using the area along the pathway.

Earlier this year Galway City Council granted planning permission to NUIG Students Union for the development of an external canopy and covered area at An Sult College Bar.

However, this is now the subject of an appeal to An Bord Pleanála by Corrib Rowing and Yachting Club on the grounds that it will impede the club’s right of way along the canal.

The college bar overlooks the Eglinton Canal and is a popular and reasonably priced haunt for students during the college term.

It was proposed to provide a canopy in addition to their external area. The college bar is a protected structure, given that it is a stone building and is the main pedestrian entrance to the university campus.

The applicants say that due to the sensitive nature of the site, the modern structure of the canopy is proposed to contrast against the protected stone structure and also create “an architectural feature” at the main pedestrian entrance.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play

 

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